Taiwan: Kaohsiung Night Markets

2 12 2008

I stopped by Taiwan while on my Asia trip, primarily staying in Kaohsiung with my relatives.  While this time I didn’t do much sightseeing, I did get to experience all my favorite parts of Taiwan, including the night market.  For information and photos on sightseeing in Kaohsiung, click here for the series I did on this very topic last year.  For all my posts on Taiwan, click here.

No matter what town or city you are staying, there will inevitably be a night market (or several).  While they might not operate every night in smaller towns, in large cities the food hawkers, clothing salespeople, drink vendors, and trinket sellers come out en force nightly. I consider the night market a must-see in Taiwan. Not only will you be able to taste delicious street food, but you will also get to see a wonderful cross section of Taiwanese life. From the young to the old, the rich to the poor, everyone goes to the night market!


View of Liuho Night Market

In Kaohsiung, the best night market is Liuho Night Market (also spelled Liouhe or Liouho). Every night, the city closes down several blocks of busy Liuho 2nd Street in order to host this night market. This is primarily a food based night market, but it also has some clothing, games, and other miscellaneous stands. There was even a stand that specialized in selling clothes for your dog!


The Liuho Night Market in Kaohsiung runs from 5 PM to 5 AM.


A stand selling dried roasted caviar. This is one of my favorite foods but is an acquired taste.


Taiwanese mifen and duck egg hawker, specializing in flavors from Tainan city. This stand has been in operation for over 30 years.


This looks plain, but it was out of this world!

While most people just eat and walk, some vendors provide tiny tables where you can slurp up your food. Other food available at the night market include but are not limited to pearl milk tea, stinky tofu, bawan (pork stuffed in a rice ball and steamed or fried), oden (boiled or grilled tofu products), Taiwanese style sausage, mifen, and desserts such as puffed batter cake, shaved ice, fruit juices, and aiyu gelatin.


The beginning of the Liuho Night Market.

Another large night market in Kaohsiung is located near Zuoying. I’m not sure the exact location, but any local would know. This night market had a broader range of merchandise for sale and a large carnival game section in addition to the usual food. There was an entire row just for women’s clothing. While it was a fun night market to browse and play in, I cannot vouch for the food since our family prefers Liuho 2nd Street for our food fix.


The beginning of the food section.


I believe this guy sells ice cream or frozen drinks.


Meatballs


Mint tea gelatin and other cold desserts


Roasted vegetables and pickled fruit


Steamed roasted peanuts


A bank of low tech pachinko games


I think I won a piece of gum.


Darts and water balloons – actually really fun!


More games


Beebee guns


Ring toss

In Taiwan, the night market is a family affair.  A combination of supermarket, carnival, and night time hangout, the night market is there to amuse and to satisfy those night time cravings.  Even though it’s hard to stay up past 6 PM for visitors who are suffering from jet lag, I highly recommend making an effort.  It’s totally worth it!

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4 responses

5 12 2008
Fili

Looking good ! I really like local looking night markets.
Haven’t been to the Kaohsiung ones yet, hopefully will get a chance to sometime soon. ^_^

7 12 2008
travelswithsandy

Thanks for dropping by, Fili! Next time you are in Kaohsiung, you should definitely stop by these night markets. 🙂

9 02 2009
Hatter

Stumbled upon your blog.. lovely photos of Leeds Castle in Kent.. my old stomping ground… wonderful history all around. We are now in the Turks and Caicos Islands, a bit different from Kent, and I see you visited Royal West Indies last year….
Check out our blog…. tciasam.blogspot.com

29 06 2010
rubelyn

i love kaohsiung so much! i miss night market..

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